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Poem Activity

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Go to the Poetry Archive ‘Shakespeare 400’ page and listen to the poet Jo Shapcott reading sonnet 73. Here you can also listen to her read her own poem ‘2014/2015’ written in response to sonnet 73. You can also watch the co-founder of Poetry By Heart, Andrew Motion, reciting the sonnet here. Compare the Shapcott and Motion versions. In what ways are they similar and different?



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Modern English Original spelling

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That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.

In me thou see’st the twilight of such day
As after sunset fadeth in the west;
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest.

In me thou see’st the glowing of such fire,
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the death-bed, whereon it must expire,
Consumed with that which it was nourish’d by.

This thou perceiv’st, which makes thy love more strong,
To love that well, which thou must leave ere long.

THat time of yeeare thou maist in me behold,
When yellow leaues, or none, or few doe hange
Vpon those boughes which shake against the could,
Bare ruin’d quiers, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou seest the twi-light of such day,
As after Sun-set fadeth in the West,
Which by and by blacke night doth take away,
Deaths second selfe that seals vp all in rest.
In me thou seest the glowing of such fire,
That on the ashes of his youth doth lye,
As the death bed, whereon it must expire,
Consum’d with that which it was nurrisht by.
This thou perceu’st, which makes thy loue more strong,
To loue that well, which thou must leaue ere long.