Poetry By Heart Blog

Kickstart Poetry By Heart on National Poetry Day

5th October 2021

This Thursday it’s the annual poetry bonanza of National Poetry Day in the UK and this year’s theme is choice. This theme couldn’t be more relevant for Poetry By Heart which all starts with pupils choosing a poem. Over at the National Poetry Day website you’ll see our friends there have launched an array of resources and toolkits, including posters and lesson plans – plenty of free stuff – to encourage your students to think about how they create, read and respond to poetry.

National Poetry Day is also a great day to think about poetry beyond its demands for exams and assessment. It’s a day to think about the big wide life of poetry, for enjoyment, for sharing, for talking about, for creativity and for wellbeing. Teachers have often told us that Poetry By Heart helps children and young people to engage with poetry in different ways, creating a real buzz about the school, developing confidence in the shyest pupils, and creating a more personal opportunity to own, inhabit and share their chosen poems. Last week’s blog entry written by a class at Linden Lodge School – providing education and support to sensory and/or visually impaired children – attests to the importance of poetry for all.

The team at Poetry By Heart have contributed two activities to the National Poetry Day collection. One is for primary pupils, the other for secondary, and both are all about selecting a poem from our online anthologies and then developing active approaches to speaking it out loud. The first activity, for Key Stages 1 and 2, could get you started with Laura Richards’ comic poem ‘Eletelephony’. The second, for older students in Key Stages 3, 4 and 5, focuses on Paul Dunbar’s poem ‘We Wear The Mask’. Click on either image below to be directed to the activity’s PDF file.

 

NPD KS1+2

 

 

NPD KS3, 4 +5

If those don’t pique your interest, here are some more ideas for kickstarting your National Poetry Day that we shared in our fortnightly Poetry Forum last week. We’d love to hear what you get up to this National Poetry Day, whether you try out one of the ideas here or have other fantastic plans lined up. So far our favourite is a small rural primary school in Suffolk where the class are all bringing in a favourite poem to share over mugs of hot chocolate. Hot chocolate and poetry! We’d love to hear your stories – Tweet-sized with pics over on @poetrybyheart or write us a longer piece for the blog!

1. Speak a favourite/random poem
Rehearse and simply speak your own favourite poem in assembly, form group or at the start or end of a lesson. You could say why it’s your favourite poem too. Or flip it and get pupils sharing their favourite poems. And for absolutely zero preparation on the day, hit the random poem button at the very bottom of the homepage, see what you get and read it aloud – or to keep the randomness within the KS2-3 poem selections, click the yellow random poem square at the bottom of any poem in the Mix It Up collection.

2. Learn a poem together
You could try one of our Learn-Along poem activities (you will need to register for free to access these). These take one poem and one class and you all have a go at learning and performing the poem in one lesson. The powerpoint resource gives you all the slides you need to take your class through the poem, with teacher instructions in the notes field. The activity invites everyone to join in with you, repeating the poem aloud together in different ways, with visual memory cues and blank fills to help work towards a memorised performance. Possible in one lesson? You bet it is!
Learn-Along 7+
Learn-Along 11+
If you’d like us to run a free Zoom workshop where we run through these activities together for teachers/staff at your school, contact us via info@poetrybyheart.org.uk or call 0117 905 5338.

3. Introduce Poetry By Heart
Use our launch slides to introduce Poetry By Heart to your class, poetry club or year group. The 5 minute film of this year’s Finalists’ Celebration Event at Shakespeare’s Globe, London, is on slide 4 – great to show where your pupils could be next summer. Sometimes security filters will block the video from playing so test it first and ask an IT technician to unblock it if necessary. It’s just a Vimeo link – nothing nasty!

4. Set October’s calendar challenge for Black History month
Check out the October challenge in the Poetry By Heart digital calendar. The October poem is Eloise Greenfield’s poem ‘Harriet Tubman’, about the American women who escaped enslavement and then rescued many other people. The challenge is to learn and perform this poem for other people as part of Black History month learning and celebration, or any other poem in the Poetry By Heart collection that recounts an aspect of Black History. You might have already had your paper copy in the post; if not, register now and we’ll send you one!

 

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Inspiring Poetry in your School through the CLiPPA Shadowing Scheme

3rd September 2020

A year ago the Poetry By Heart competition and timeline poetry collections expanded to include children and young people in key stages 2 and 3. We didn’t quite know what to expect, particularly from the youngest but we ended up blown away by all the fantastic performances. This would have come to no surprise to CLPE and the teachers who take part in the wonderful CLiPPA Shadowing Scheme.

We’re really looking forward to the announcement next month of the CLiPPA shortlist of the best new children’s poetry books. We’ll be looking out for great poems from these collections that we might want to add to the Poetry By Heart collections. If you take part in the Shadowing Scheme, let us know what you and your students love best! 

clippa header
Poetry is one of the most important branches of literature. We’re introduced to language and reading through the rhyme we hear and join in with as children and our poetry journey begins there. How well we travel along the road depends on how well exposed we are along the way to the joys and potential poetry offers to us as readers and writers.

 

Here at the CLPE (Centre for Literacy in Primary Education) we believe poetry is a fundamental element in the development of children’s literacy. We see the importance of children hearing from, working with or watching professional poets. Seeing a poet bring their own work to life and beginning to understand what that means in terms of the creation of poetry helps children to see themselves as writers.  Listen to poets talk about their writing process; what inspires them, their unique voices, how they work, how they draft, edit and redraft – all this yields a wealth of information to consider the freedoms and support we give children in their own writing.

 

Our Poetryline website (https://clpe.org.uk/poetryline) offers all of this, for children to see and hear many poets, both well-loved and contemporary. This inspires children and enriches their learning, hearing from a poet direct can encourage a love of poetry for life.

 

Our poetry award and schools shadowing scheme enhance poetry in primary and secondary schools. Each year the CLiPPA (Centre for Literacy in Primary Poetry Award) Shadowing Scheme begins in hundreds of schools across England. The scheme encourages children to read, write and perform poetry written by CLiPPA shortlisted poets using FREE CLPE teaching resources. Teachers are then invited to send in individual or class performance videos from which overall winners are chosen by the CLPE.

 

The schools shadowing scheme has been transformational for children and teachers.

 

CLiPPA perfromance 2018
“This experience has transformed not only my teaching of poetry but how the children in my class relate to it. I am confident that should anyone ask my class if they enjoy poetry their answer would be yes. The significance of deep exploration and the performance of poetry which CLiPPA highly promotes enabled my class to connect with the poems they studied, to understand the emotion in the poetry, and allowed them to take themselves to that destination – become that character (or in our winning performance’s case become ‘Old Foxy’).”

 

– Gemma Gibson, Teacher involved in the Shadowing Scheme in 2018.

 

 

CLiPPA perfromance 2019

 

“So would I recommend that you try the shadowing scheme with your class? YES! The teaching sequences are easy to follow and the children really benefit from the immersive approaches and the whole shadowing scheme has created a real buzz about poetry in our school.”

 

– Mary Gahan, Teacher involved in the Shadowing Scheme in 2019.

 

Every year the fantastic performances submitted by schools enable us to see the transformative power of poetry in engaging and developing the confidence of young readers.

 

The shadowing scheme involves children across the primary years and students in Key Stage 3. Get involved this year, and inspire and promote poetry in your class: https://clpe.org.uk/aboutus/news/clpe-announce-new-partnership-years-clippa

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The Ear Is The Best Reader

24th February 2017

As Robert Frost once said, ‘the ear is the best reader’ and it is on this philosophy that The Poetry Archive was founded.

After meeting in a recording studio, Sir Andrew Motion (UK Poet Laureate 1999 – 2009) and the recording producer Richard Carrington, agreed how enjoyable and illuminating it is to hear poets reading their work and how regrettable it was that in the twentieth century many important poets had not been properly recorded. Major poets such as Hardy, Housman, Lawrence had never been recorded at all, and now that opportunity was lost forever.

Launched in 2005, the Poetry Archive now offers a free resource of national and international significance which has at its heart a belief in the profound insights that come from hearing poets’ own readings of their work.

From www.poetryarchive.org you can access and listen to the world’s premier online collection of recordings of poets reading their own work. The Archive exists to make poetry accessible, relevant and enjoyable to as wide audience as possible so alongside freely accessible recordings and a wealth of background information and materials, the Poetry Archive continues to develop new ways to provide teachers with the support they need. We have a range of exciting plans in the pipeline for 2017 and if you would like to get involved, or benefit from special offers and priority news on projects and developments, or simply hear our latest news, please subscribe to our teachers newsletter here.

We want you to love exploring our Poets and collections and we will continue to develop resources with teachers’ needs in mind:

MyArchive: The MyArchive feature of our website allows you to create your own account and bookmark collections and recordings that you would like to quickly and easily return to later, creating bespoke lessons and streaming collections as and when you are ready. There is no limit to the number of collections you can create, or how long you can keep them – they will be saved and ready as you need them.

Classroom Collections: If you don’t need to keep your own collections ready using MyArchive, you can use one of our tailor made Classroom Collections, which have been curated with teaching in mind. Go to the Teach section of our website and you will find collections such as Gothic Poetry, WW1 Poetry and Caribbean Poetry alongside suggested Lesson Plans and Glossary terms.

Download Audio: Our collections are free where we are able to negotiate those rights with our Poets and publishers, but if you wanted to take poems further you can use our Download Store to purchase individual poems and load them onto other devices to play anytime. We have created specific GCSE teaching focused albums, such as, ‘Poems from the AQA GCSE Anthology’, ‘Poems from the Edexcel GCSE Anthology’ and ‘Power and Conflict (Poems from GCSE Anthologies)’ to support your activities.

We are delighted to continue to support Poetry By Heart and we hope you enjoy exploring our collections.

We look forward to sharing our future plans with you.

Tracey Guiry
Director
The Poetry Archive

Between 2013 and 2016 Poetry By Heart was the principal educational initiative of The Poetry Archive, developed with The Full English and supported by the Department of Education. It was co-founded by Andrew Motion (Co-Director of The Poetry Archive) and Julie Blake ) Co-Director of The Full English and Education Director of The Poetry Archive) in February 2012.

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Libraries at the Heart of Communities

23rd September 2015

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PBH 2014 Champion Matilda Neill of Whitley Bay High School receiving her trophy from Sir Andrew Motion

This year 15 Poetry By Heart county competitions will be organised by much admired library services in association with Poetry By Heart. Our second September Blog is provided by not one but two librarians who talk about their experiences of Poetry By Heart

 

Libraries By Heart 1   by Gareth Ellis (Library Manager Whitley Bay High School)

 

It was the delicious simplicity of the idea that first struck us: memorise a poem by heart. The process, long abandoned by schools as a routine method of teaching, suddenly seemed both a new concept and a tradition worth saving. Using it as a means of exploring the depths and breadths of a poem, of building confidence in students and, ultimately, of having fun, made it irresistible. For us, the prospect of learning and competing within a school context, a county environment and maybe even on a national level breathed fresh air into this most fundamental – and actually rather ancient – activity.

Whitley Bay High School, a large state comprehensive of over 1600 students in North Tyneside, first took part in Poetry by Heart in 2014 and then again in 2015. In 2014 we were lucky enough to see our hugely talented student Matilda Neill go on to win the competition and our competitor in 2015 also got to the finals, so we’ve been privileged to see how Poetry by Heart works from the beginning right through to the end! But ultimately the real reward has been the opportunity to work with young people and watch as they choose, inhabit and possess their poems and how they draw an audience into their reading of the piece through their own unique interpretation of it.

The process is very straight-forward and the Poetry by Heart team are always on hand to assist. In Whitley Bay High School the competition is run as a joint venture between the Library and the Drama Department, with help from English teachers too. We advertise the opportunity to all students in Years 10 – 13, meet with keen and interested competitors to delve into Poetry by Heart’s incredible online poetry timeline and then offer students times to come along and rehearse their poems, if they want to. We found that all our competitors were keen to come and practise regularly and these meetings turned into treasured lunchtimes during which we heard their performances and fellow competitors supported each other, offering feedback and constructive criticism. Then we launch our school event, inviting staff and students to watch and witness the announcement of our winner who then gets the privilege of performing at a county level.

We’ve found Poetry by Heart to be a hugely positive experience and the competition has become an annual expectation within school, with staff and students eagerly anticipating it. Furthermore, it’s raised the profile of poetry within the school community, generated an excited discussion around literature and given students the chance to explore and develop their own communication and literacy skills. It’s also opened doors into poetry rooms our students might not have otherwise found the key to. They’ve discovered poems and poets they might not have normally encountered, have been exposed to movements and styles, genres and modes and have been (thanks to the online timeline) able to place these within the wider, greater tradition of poetry in English.  When students memorise a poem they’re possessing something that will stay with them forever and as their lives develop, take shape, shift and change, so too will their understanding and interpretation of the poem. The poet Don Paterson often describes a poem as ‘a little machine for remembering itself’. Poetry by Heart oils the cogs of that machine, and our students who have been involved in the competition have come away all the richer for it.

Ellis, Gareth GJE copyAbout the Author: Gareth Ellis is a Chartered Librarian and has been the Library Manager at Whitley Bay High School for over a decade. He has an interest in and a passion for poetry and has an MA in Modern & Contemporary Poetry from the University of Bristol. Gareth runs a variety of reading and poetry initiatives at Whitley Bay High School, including school visits from the likes of Carol Ann Duffy and Simon Armitage, and an annual Literature & Performing Arts Festival. He has recently been designated a Specialist Leader in Education.  

 

 

Libraries By Heart 2  by Ian Anstice (Locality Librarian for Cheshire West and Chester Council)

Poetry By Heart 2015 The Cheshire County Contest at Chester Town Hall

Poetry By Heart 2015 The Cheshire County Contest at Chester Town Hall

Much to my shame, I had not heard about Poetry By Heart before being told it was one of my duties to arrange the Cheshire judging.  This pained me as I’m both a full time librarian and responsible for Public Libraries News so most of my time is spent in public libraries one way or another and I should have known about it, especially as I was to discover how great it was.  Thankfully, my very helpful colleague Debbie Owen had arranged the competition the year before and ensured I did everything necessary.

The first thing I learnt was that, and this was quite a surprise to me being used to local council finances, the whole thing was fully funded. Yes indeed, money was attached.  This meant that we could book a great venue (the very impressive Chester Town Hall)  and arrange a Master of Ceremonies for the evening (the no less impressive – but a lot more fun, sorry Chester Town Hall – performance poet Dominic Berry). There was even (whisper it) something left over for refreshments, a photographer and presents for the judges.

Yes, judges.  This is a proper thing. There’s not just one judge.  Oh no. There’s at least two main judges (we kept the Cheshire poet Gill McEvoy and newspaper reporter Carmella De Lucia from the year before) who judge how good the poem readings are and also an accuracy judge who checks basic things like words, or even whole lines, being missed. Not wanting to pass everything off on others, I got to be technical judge that evening.

The actual schools are contacted by the Poetry By Heart regional co-ordinator and do all the preparatory work themselves so for me I could concentrate just on the judging event. The co-ordinator just let me know how many schools were attending and the names of the students so that was pretty easy as well, especially as I quite enjoy producing programmes. So the big day came and everything was ready and I was quietly confident the day before

And then it started snowing. Not just a little snow, oh no.  Big snow. And although I got to work OK, it was clear that the east of the county was getting far more. When I phoned one of the schools to see if their students were still on for that evening, I could tell that the school secretary (while polite) clearly thought I was stark, raving insane.  Panic stations. Thankfully, ten phone calls later we had got agreement from Chester Town Hall to reschedule at no extra charge and contacted everyone to let them know it was not happening.  Except, sadly, one judge who we simply could not get hold of who turned up in the evening. I am so glad to say that Gill took it in great part, and happily turned up for the rearranged evening.

And, my, was I blown away. You hear a lot about how terrible teenagers are.  You know, slouching around, growing their hair long, listening to loud music (or was that the 60s?) but, my goodness, all of the contestants were beyond good.  These were teenagers who not only had memorised whole poems but could speak them clearly and also put emotion into it. Their teachers came too and there was a lot of pride in the air for all their performances.  And, quite right too, because every single one was impressive. The talent clearly showed what a good idea the whole competition was, with the students doubtless about to go on to do wonderful things and this experience will help to give them confidence to do it. Frankly, also, it will  instil in them something better: a love for poetry that will be of uncountable benefit.

For public libraries, the Poetry By Heart competition gives us entry into that most difficult of markets, that of the teenager.  Although junior schools are a prime source of readers for us, all that changes when the kids go to Big School. Often we don’t see them again until they come back again while they’re studying at University or when they have kids themselves.  The competition gives libraries a chance to remind students of our existence and how we can help them.  It also hits the spot when it comes to poetry, which again, is not an easy sell. I would also suggest that for those authorities who have school library services, running the competition could strengthen a natural connection between schools and libraries.

So, librarians, if someone tells you it’s your chance to run a competition by these people, grasp the opportunity in both hands.  You never know, you may even learn some poetry in the process yourself.

Ian AnsticeAbout the Author: Ian Anstice is proud to have been a librarian in Cheshire since 1994 and now works as Locality Librarian for Cheshire West and Chester Council. He is responsible for reader development and children’s stock as well as other things like the Summer Reading Challenge.  In his spare time, he created the Public Libraries News blog which is now a main source of information in the sector, regularly used and quoted by library users, campaigners, the media and politicians.  He was named IWR Information Professional of the Year in 2011 and has won two Winsford Town Oscars for customer service in 2012 and 2014.

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Romford Primary Schools Celebrate Poetry Week

7th July 2015

Poetry Week celebrations in Romford Primary Schools

For the past three years the Poetry By Heart London East county competition has been held in Romford Library. Karen Jordan and her staff at the library have organised superb events and in the last two years the London East champion has made the final eight of the national competition. But it is not just in the 14 to 18 sector where the act of taking a poem to heart is flourishing.

 

Over the course of a week the Multi Story Theatre Company worked in seven Romford Primary schools with a variety of year groups. Hillene, Broadford, Pyrgo and Mead Primary, along with Brookside and St Ursula’s Infants and St Ursula’s Juniors all took part in an inspiring Poetry Week celebration.

The ambition for the week was to engage the children in the joy of speaking poetry out loud: how do the words sound and feel as they’re spoken, where does the poem connect with you – head, heart or body?

One of the joys of the week was seeing how the children responded to a challenging collection of poems. W.H.Auden with 10 Year olds? Amy Lowell with 8 year olds? You bet! Several of Carol Ann Duffy’s poems were featured and these bought out the best in every age group.In fact, the more complex and challenging the poem, the more mature the response.

Bill Buffery from the Multi Story Theatre company commented: “As theatre practitioners and workshop leaders we can honestly say that leading these Poetry and Performance workshop weeks is one of the most satisfying experiences of the year. It’s really moving  to watch the quality of the children’s understanding of the world developing through their engagement with poetic language. It is also so pleasing to see a group of schools working together to champion the performing arts and use them to inspire the children!”

In the finale performance, all of the pupils joined together to perform AA Milne’s poem ‘Sneezles’. As a cluster we offer the pupils a wide range of opportunities to showcase their skills and talents: poetry, spelling, sports and maths. Seeing them all collaborate and enjoy the language of some great poems was a real joy. To also share that with parents from all seven schools made the event even more memorable.

I will leave the last word to Ruby Burchell from Broadford Primary: “Our poem was ‘Begged’ by Carol Ann Duffy. It was great fun to read it out loud as it was packed with tricky rhymes, alliteration and twists. I did feel nervous, but I loved the performance and want to do it again.”

 Malcolm Drakes is the Headteacher of Broadford Primary School – which is situated in Harold Hill, Romford. As Chair of the local cluster of primary schools, Malcolm initiated a Poetry Week. The key aim is to widen the cultural experience for the area’s pupils who often come from deprived backgrounds. It also celebrates performance poetry and provides an opportunity for pupils to enrich their knowledge of language. Through their YouTube Channel and blog the school seeks to promote and celebrate a wide range of learning opportunities that have helped Broadford Primary become one of the top performing primary schools in the country.

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Introducing Poetry By Heart to the Primary Sector

2nd December 2014

She Sells Sea Shells by She_Who_Must 2007 Creative Commons

Last week saw Poetry By Heart Director, Julie Blake, taking Brighton University first year Primary Education undergraduates through their poetry performance paces!

 

Starting with some rhythm and rhyme, and not a few comic images, we kicked off by creating a register poem. I couldn’t remember the names but I could remember the cat-lovers and the girls whose names rhymed with frilly! A couple of tongue-twisters got us warmed up for reciting fast and slow, loud and low, after which we went for the full body workout with John Foster’s ‘The Dinosaur Rap’. Pity the class on the floor below… We needed a rest after that so we experimented with storyboarding as a method for really getting inside Robert Louis Stevenson’s ‘From A Railway Carriage’ and had it memorised as a class (each person taking a couplet) within half an hour. I finished by putting my money where my mouth had been all afternoon, and recited Irene McLeod’s ‘The Lone Dog’.

But why? Poetry By Heart is for 14-18 year olds? Well, since we launched in 2012, learning poems by heart has been inscribed in the National Curriculum for primary education and we have had very many enquiries from primary teachers and advisors asking us if we can help. Always happy to share what we’ve learned and to collaborate with interested colleagues, we are now working on a primary resource pack. Well, to be honest, we’re not quite sure yet if it will be a primary resource pack, or a Key Stage 2-3 pack, and we welcome all opportunities for dialogue, trialling and piloting. Please get in touch if you’d like to join the conversation:  info@poetrybyheart.org.uk.

Meanwhile, during 2013-14 we were delighted to collaborate with Dr Josie Brady and her PGCE Primary students at Birmingham City University on an action research project. Dr Brady reports on their experience here:

The NATE Conference and the Poetry by Heart Primary Project: A highlight of an academic year.

A real highlight of the 2013-14 academic year for me was the Poetry by Heart Primary Project as helping PGCE Primary students to develop pedagogies for poetry as a verbal art in primary and early years classrooms was both a tremendous challenge and a great joy. The NATE conference in Bristol in July marked the culmination of this endeavour as a group of my PGCE students presented their ideas, experiences, reflections and findings to an audience of teachers, academics and consultants.

Presenting at the NATE conference Bristol July 2014

Looking at the above photo now, I still feel that rising swell of pride and I know students were overjoyed at the positive responses they received. Thank you NATE delegates and thank you Poetry by Heart for making the project possible and supporting us along the rocky way!

Before I sign off, I leave the last words to two of my students, Emily and Kate, who are of course, now fully qualified teachers enjoying and enduring the highs and lows of busy Autumn terms.

“Being part of a project that has collaborated with Poetry by Heart has been a fantastic experience. I had undertaken a very successful project on poetry memorisation in a primary school with thirty 7 and 8 year olds and needless to say I was apprehensive about the outcomes initially. However, I found that not only did the children gain a lot from the project but I did too. My enthusiasm and knowledge of poetry, and poetry from memory, has dramatically increased and having the opportunity to discuss the outcomes at the NATE conference is something that I will always treasure. The support from Poetry by Heart, Julie and Tim in particular, has been fantastic and this collaborative project, I feel, has been extremely successful. The thought of implementing poetry memorisation and recitation into primary schools is now such an exciting thought and I think I can say that speaking not only for myself but other PGCE graduates who were involved in the project too.” Emily

“Going to NATE and sharing, alongside fellow students, my learning journey with professionals was a fantastic experience. Just to be able to hear other people’s opinions on what we have done and where we could go from there was very interesting. It gave me fresh insights which were truly enlightening.”  Kate

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National Poetry Day and Poetry By Heart

17th October 2014

James reciting at the Poetry Podium in Bristol

National Poetry Day on October 2nd saw members of the Poetry By Heart team hit the road in search of some poetry inspired adventures. Poetry pilgrims Alison Powell, Kath Lee and Tom Boughen share some tales below.

 

Alison Powell (Regional Development Coordinator for the South West) organised an innovative “Poetry Podium” event in Bristol.

 The (Loud) Sound of Sense

How do you make a three-year-old, a distant relative of Andrew Marvell and a retired dancer from Bristol happy?  By giving them the chance to read poetry in public apparently.  To celebrate this year’s National Poetry Day the South West contingency of PBH came up with the Poetry Podium, a flash-mob-style, open-air event in which members of the public were encouraged to join us on College Green in Bristol and read their favourite poem out loud.  And by loud, I mean really loud.  As in, through a megaphone loud!

Robert Frost claimed that poetry has a ‘sound of sense’ and can ‘communicate through its sound even before we grasp its semantic meaning.’  The sound of poetry blasting across the city centre’s favourite picnicking spot brought smiles, laughter and, when Keith Walker read his eulogy to his wife and dance partner, a few poignant tears.  Tim Popple, director of music at Bristol Cathedral, delighted us with ‘Bermudas’, chosen because of his relation to poet Marvell.  And three-year-old Autumn sang to us that famous 19th century poem ‘The Star’ by Jane Taylor (aka ‘Twinkle, Twinkle’).

People came from all over town to take part and to listen in a true testament to the power of poetry spoken aloud.  (Alison Powell)

Autumn aged 3 reciting at the poetry podium in Bristol with a little help from MC Faye Dicker

 

Tom Boughen (Poetry By Heart Project Assistant) enjoyed the Foyle Young Poets awards and a poetry extravaganza at the Southbank Centre in London

On the last two National Poetry Days, I have found myself at a celebration in the heart of London, hobnobbing with a group of talented and passionate people. Last year we launched Poetry By Heart on National Poetry Day (within a week of me starting this job!) This year I travelled down to the Southbank Centre in London with Julie Blake the co-director of Poetry By Heart for the Foyle Young Poets awards and subsequent poetry readings. It was a celebration of both young and established poets, with classic and contemporary styles.

I won’t lie; the Foyle group of youngsters made me feel very old! The young poets had been selected from thousands of entries from around the world and the fifteen deserving winners read their work at the awards. I’ve got a decade on most of them and the level of maturity and sophistication in their poems surprised me. It’s given me a strong reminder that I should no longer be amazed by the talent of teenagers, especially after working with Poetry By Heart! We’re well aware that lots of our PBH students also have a talent for writing, and it would be great to see some familiar faces at the Foyle Young Poets awards in the future.

One of the best things about the day was the encouragement of children and teenagers to engage in poetry. Local schools were invited to listen to readings by John Hegley, Julia Donaldson (writer of the classic ‘The Gruffalo’), and some cool contemporary poets like Hollie McNish, Dizraeli, Ross Sutherland, Raymond Antrobus and Joelle Taylor. They understood their audience, and some of the children watching seemed young enough for this to be their first poetry reading. I’ve come to realise over the past year that one of the biggest challenges facing the world of poetry is convincing the public that it can speak for everybody and challenge conventional thought in the same way that people readily accept other forms of literature can do. Involving children in these kinds of events is an excellent way of conveying from a young age the fact that poetry is universal, whether communicated on the page or in spoken word. That’s National Poetry Day for you!

(Tom Boughen)

Winners of the Foyle Young Poets Award 2014. Photograph:copyright @ Hayley Madden – Courtesy of the Poetry Society http://www.poetrysociety.org.uk/

 

Kath Lee (Poetry By Heart Project Coordinator) navigated the magnificent new Library of Birmingham for the launch of the Poetry By Heart anthology and a memorable evening in the company of poet Jackie Kay.

What better way to spend the evening of National Poetry Day than in the company of the wonderful Jackie Kay? Mike Dixon, (Poetry By Heart Regional Development Coordinator for the South East) and I accepted the kind invitation from our friends at Writing West Midlands to the opening event of this year’s Birmingham Literature Festival. It also marked the launch of the Poetry By Heart Anthology.

The best poetry readings are like the best first date; you get all the best stories, a few revelations and wittiest repartee. Jackie’s poems are also populated by a wide variety of voices, so by the end of the evening you’ve also been introduced to the family.  Jackie read mainly from her 2011 collection ‘Fiere’ and those poems are optimistic and cheery, even when addressing the complexities of families and her own less than ordinary personal history. She also read our PBH timeline and anthology choice, ‘Dusting the Phone’ which we loved, but she says she is mystified at its selection from all her work. We’re not sure we had the poets in mind when we suggested people ‘Argue with the Anthology’, but why not? Her Question and Answer session was a happy blend of thoughtful reflection on her writing process and fond recollections of her childhood, and giggling. All this, and her generous praise of the new anthology, meant that by the end of the evening we were completely smitten!  (Kath Lee)

Library of Birmingham: Photographer: Bruce Stokes https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/legalcode

 

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Is there a poem in your head?

3rd October 2014

The nationwide Poetry and Memory survey launched on 2nd October, UK National Poetry Day. The survey is part of the Cambridge University’s Poetry and Memory Project, which is investigating experiences of poetry learning, and examining the relationships between memorisation, recitation and understanding. David Whitley and Debbie Pullinger of the Faculty of Education at Cambridge University have been very interested in the work of Poetry By Heart and some of the research undertaken as part of their Cambridge Poetry Teaching Project appears in the Resources section of the Poetry By Heart website. Project Researcher Dr Debbie Pullinger tells us about this new and exciting Poetry and Memory Project.

 

Do you have a poem in your head? Then do come and tell us about it. It can be any poem, and any type of poem – we just ask that it isn’t a song lyric or a nursery rhyme.

There have been quite a few poetry polls over the years, mostly directed at finding the nation’s favourites. Our aim, however, is rather different. We want to discover what poems people know by heart – what poetry resides in our collective memory, at this moment, in October 2014. To the best of our knowledge, this is first time a survey of this kind and scope has been attempted.

As well as asking what the poem is and when you learned it, we’re also asking a couple of open-ended questions about what it means for you. The important thing here is that we’re emphatically not looking for GCSE English answers, or an analysis of what the poem is ‘supposed to be about’. Rather, we want to know about the personal significance of this particular poem. This might be to something do with the meaning, but it could also be to do with the sound. It may be that there’s one line which is particularly special. It may be that how you understand or feel about the poem has changed over the years.  It may be that you associate the poem with a particular occasion or period of your life. Or, it could be that the poem you know actually has very little meaning or significance for you at all – and we want to know about that, too.

Straight off, we expect to be able to announce what poems beat most strongly at the heart of the nation. It will be interesting, too, to see how they map on to those favourites lists. But aside from producing a headline top ten, there’s a great deal more that we’ll be able to do with this data.  We’ll be able to investigate, for example, the reasons why people now learn poetry, and the perceived value of doing so. We’re particularly interested in questions about the ‘use’ of learned poems – how they might act as an emotional resource, contribute to a sense of identity, assist in the development of an ear for language, engender a sense of community, play a role in memories of a personal or communal past. What does knowing a poem mean for someone, and indeed what different things does it mean for different people?

We’re really looking forward to seeing the responses to the survey and sharing the results. But, of course, its success as a piece of research hangs on getting a good response – which means we need lots of people to take part. So we really do need your help. You can do this in two ways.

Take part in the survey – if you have a poem in your head, please come and tell us about it. http://www.poetryandmemory.com/

 

Spread the word –  even if you don’t know a poem yourself, do pass the word on to family, friends, neighbours and colleagues. I should also mention that it will be possible for print out a copy of the survey to give to anyone unable to access it online. They can then post it back to us using the Freepost address.

You can get spreading any way you fancy. Phone a friend. Find us on Facebook (The Poetry and Memory Project). Tweet on Twitter: @poetryandmemory #poetryandmemorysurvey.  Print a poster and display it on your favourite notice board.

Whatever you can do, we’ll be enormously grateful.

The survey runs from 2nd–31st October and is open to anyone in the UK aged 18 or over. For more about the survey and the Poetry and Memory Project: www.poetryandmemory.com

image of staff member

Debbie Pullinger is the project’s full-time researcher, based in the Faculty of Education, where she also teaches on the Children and Literature course. Her doctoral project, completed in 2013, was on orality and textuality in poetry written for children. Debbie worked in primary teaching, in educational publishing, and as a freelance writer before returning to academia in 2009.

 

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