Poetry By Heart Blog

Why Poetry?

19th January 2015

Chew Valley Participants at their Poetry By Heart competition.

Deputy Headteacher Chris Hildrew reflects on the importance of poetry in his personal and professional life and his commitment to his ‘Poetry Promise’.

 

This year, I have made a Poetry Promise. My promise is to mark each month of the year with a favourite poem, shared online, with an explanation of why that particular poem is so special to me. The aim of the Poetry Promise is to raise the profile of Poetry by Heart and, by extension, share the love of poetry itself. How could I say no? I was knee deep in favourite poems on New Year’s Eve, trying to find that one I wanted for August!

Reflecting on my choices, I took stock of my relationship with poetry. Poetry has always moved me, really ever since I can remember. But it was at secondary school that it took hold of me, truly possessed me. I wrote tortured teenage verse in my diary, tried in vain to write a sestina that worked, and sat back in awe as my A-level Literature course took me on a tour through time from Chaucer to Heaney. It was the work of Sylvia Plath that was, and remains, my all-time favourite. Reading her work left me feeling like the hanging man in her poem of that name: “By the roots of my hair some god got hold of me.” I sizzled in the electricity of her verse.

As a teacher, I’ve always looked forward to teaching poetry. There’s something magical about unlocking it, about seeing it click into place in a student’s mind. Poetry never fails to provide those lightbulb moments. But what is it about poetry that makes it so distinct?

One of my favourite lessons that I planned as an NQT, and still use today, is an introductory lesson for A Level literature. In it, I present a series of texts: some prose, some poetry. Some of them are presented as written, others disguised: poems laid out like prose, prose laid out like poetry. I challenge the students to see through the disguises, with the aim of answering the question: what makes a poem a poem? The answers don’t really matter; the discussion is always mind-bending.

From years of teaching that lesson, I think I feel comfortable with the answer “a poem is a poem if we say it’s a poem.” Because the act of saying “this is a poem” lifts the language “above a common bound”, and gives it muscle. Words in poems have extra heft, like they’re loaded with lead shot; but they are nimble, their associations skipping across the page like spiders on a web.

When the occasion demands it, only a poem will do. Wedding, funerals, falling in love, the pain of goodbye…at these moments, dribbling prose won’t cut it. Only the poem can do the emotional heavy lifting required by these landmark events. That’s why the poet laureate is still such a key role, as Carol Ann Duffy has been admirably proving since 2009, in capturing landmarks in our national life. I still think “Translating the British” did a wonderful job of capturing the spirit of London 2012.

Chew Valley Poetry By Heart participant.

As a teacher in a school it’s my job and my pleasure to open up the spinning world of poetry for young people, not so they can pass exams and memorise the difference between a trochaic and an iambic rhythm, but so they can sit back with their eyes shut as they try to touch the edges of the emotions they have just experienced in the words of another. When I saw our students in our Poetry by Heart final this year, I almost forgot to breathe as they animated, inhabited, lived their recitations. The head judge was moved to tears. I will never forget it.

That is why poetry.

Chris Hildrew with his Poetry Promise

 

 

 

Chris Hildrew is Deputy Headteacher of Chew Valley School near Bristol. Follow @chrishildrew and read Chris’s blog at chrishildrew.wordpress.com

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New Additions to the Poetry By Heart First World War Showcase

2nd January 2015

In January and Feburary 2015  the county round of Poetry By Heart will be taking place up and down the country in arts centres, libraries and museums. In forty two different venues students will be reciting not only their pre and post 1914 poems but also a poem chosen from the special Poetry By Heart First World War showcase. In another January Blog post Anne Caldwell reflects on how she made use of the showcase within a memorable First World War commemorative event in Bolton whilst below Poetry By Heart Project Assistant Tom Boughen highlights some of the new additions to the showcase

 

The First World War collection has been an integral part of the Poetry By Heart experience for over a year. We uploaded the first poems to the showcase in November 2013 to coincide with Remembrance Day, and were impressed by the way in which so many students brought these poems to life with emotional and powerful recitations in the County rounds.

We’re very pleased to announce that we have expanded the collection for the centenary year! The aim has always been to include a variety of voices, from the old British favourites Owen and Sassoon, to Guillaume Apollinaire (French), Edward Slonski (Polish), Stadler and Trakl (German), Seeger (American); the contemporary voices (Andrew Motion, Mick Imlah, Owen Sheers), and to also include the voices of women such as Sara Teasdale and Helen Mackay, offering witness to the horrors of war from the home front and hospital units. Taken together from so many different sources, we hoped that this collection would be a diverse showcase of poetry from different corners of the same conflict.

With these additions we hope our collection continues in this vein.

Anna Akhmatova – In Memoriam, July 19, 1914

http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/in-memoriam-july-19-1914/

Akhmatova’s poem is the first in our collection to shed light on the Russian experience, and concerns the declaration of war on Germany; with a real sense of impending doom.

Laurence Binyon – For The Fallen

http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/for-the-fallen/

You already know the fourth stanza; it is quoted every 11th November…

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

Discover the rest of Binyon’s elegant and enduring tribute.

Mary Borden – Song of The Mud  

Mary Borden (Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery)

http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/song-of-the-mud/

One of the greatest horrors of trench warfare is often overlooked. Borden writes about the ‘invincible, inexhaustible mud of the war zone’ in a poem that becomes distinctly more nightmarish as it goes on.

Eleanor Farjeon – Easter Monday (In Memoriam E.T.)

http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/easter-monday-in-memoriam-e-t/

You may know the prolific poet Edward Thomas – he also appears in our anthology. Eleanor Farjeon, best known for her children’s stories, had a close relationship with Thomas which ended in heartbreak with his death in April 1917. This poem is affecting for its simplicity with a particularly poignant ending. Farjeon’s mourning is tangible throughout the lines.

Julian Grenfell – Into Battle

http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/into-battle/

The best-known war poets – for example Sassoon and Owen – are vociferously anti-war and deeply cynical. Grenfell’s poem is one of few in our collection that is overwhelmingly in favour of the war, portraying the soldier’s struggle as one of destiny. It is curious to wonder how Grenfell’s thoughts on the war might have changed had he lived past 1915.

Rudyard Kipling – My Boy Jack

http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/my-boy-jack/

A poem about loss and regret, and barely disguised mourning for Kipling’s son Jack, killed in action early on in the war. A simple poem, but no less powerful for its simplicity

Glyn Maxwell – My Grandfather At The Pool

http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/my-grandfather-at-the-pool/

Contemporary poet and Poetry By Heart judge Glyn Maxwell’s poem is about the act of remembrance and his grandfather, and the effect history has on the living.

Ezra Pound – Hugh Selwyn Mauberley (Part I)

http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/hugh-selwyn-mauberley-part-i/

This is an extract taken from Pound’s lengthy eighteen-part poem. His language is visceral and contemptuous of the ‘botched civilisation’, ‘an old bitch gone in the teeth’ for which so many men died.

Edgell Rickword – Trench Poets

http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/trench-poets/

The first of two new additions by Edgell Rickword. He served as a soldier and survived the war, becoming increasingly more political in later life as a committed socialist. This poem is bleakly comic, describing a solder attempting to fend off the rats and worms from consuming the body of his dead friend (we told you it was bleak!).

Edgell Rickword – The Soldier Addresses His Body

http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/the-soldier-addresses-his-body/

There is a strange sense of detachment in this poem, and Rickword returns to the gallows humour present in Trench Poets. It ends with an unusual sense of self-deprecation, as he decides to ‘have a drink, and give the cards a run and leave dull verse to the dull peaceful time.’

That’s our run through the new additions! With the county contests coming up, hopefully we’ll see and hear some of them being recited at arts venues and libraries across the country.

 

Tom Boughen (standing second from the left with other members of the Poetry By Heart team) is a key part of the Poetry By Heart set up for the 2014-15 competition having completed a work placement with Penguin UK to help out with the Poetry By Heart book published on October 2nd. He is a University of Bristol history graduate and the PBH paid project assistant for the life of the competition.

(Main image above – ‘Poppy Field’ by Mark Shirley – Creative Commons)

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Creative Use of the Poetry By Heart World War One Showcase

2nd January 2015

Anne Caldwell introduces student readers at the World War One commemorative event in Bolton.

 

In January and Feburary 2015  the county round of Poetry By Heart will be taking place up and down the country in arts centres, libraries and museums. In forty two different venues students will be reciting not only their pre and post 1914 poems but also a poem chosen from the special Poetry By Heart World War One showcase. In another January Blog post Tom Boughen talks about new additions to the showcase whilst in this article Anne Caldwell reflects on how she made use of the showcase within a memorable World War One commemorative event in Bolton.

 

I am a poet and currently the Programme Director for the National Association for Writers in Education. I also teach creative writing at the University of Bolton, where I run a live literature series in the town to encourage our undergraduate students to get involved in the wider literary life of the North West, hear writers of all genres read their work and talk passionately about their writing lives.

As part of the First World War commemorative events, the Bolton Octagon theatre revived the play, Early One Morning,  https://octagonbolton.co.uk/early-one-morning written by a Bolton based Playwright, Les Smith to great critical acclaim. I wanted my students to also have a chance to perform in public and develop their presentation skills, so I put together an event where Les talked about his creative ideas and research for the play, and students read a selection of First World War poetry. This event took place at the end of October 2014 in a beautiful lecture theatre space in Bolton Central Library.

I had a team of four students willing to take part in the event.  We used the Poetry by Heart website, and its First World War poetry time line as a source of inspiration to choose the poems we wished to present. The event was not focussed on memorisation, but did have the aim of introducing this poetry to a wide audience and building up my students’ confidence in reading. We had a very fruitful discussion about the material on the website as the students were keen to read poems by women and German writers as well as more well known work. I hosted this part of the evening and introduced each poet, again using the biographical material from the Poetry by Heart website, to help the audience understand a little of the context of the poems. My students chose work by Owen Sheers, Wilfred Owen, Rose Macaulay and Ernst Stadler.

The audience feedback was extremely positive:

“Need more like this! Students’ own work as well.”

“Informative, beautiful surroundings and a wonderful opportunity to hear a playwright explain their process for a particular production.”

“Interesting insight on World War. Beautiful playwright.”

“Awesome.”

“Well structured –varied/interesting. Student readers –good idea, it’s an experience for the reader, as much as the listener.”

We had an audience of over fifty people, including members of the general public and other students from the University of Bolton.  One of my students had never stood up in front of an audience before and nearly backed out, due to nerves. She read beautifully. Another graduate student has gone on to perform at open mic events in the area and has had paid work evaluating Bolton’s first international poetry festival, ‘Live from Worktown.’

I am now planning further opportunities in the spring to build on this success and have invited Manchester based poet Shamshad Khan to present her poetry.  She will host an evening for my students to read their own work in public at the Octagon Theatre.  I am also using the Poetry by Heart website, (and regularly use the Poetry Archive in class)  with my undergraduate students to help widen their knowledge and reading of poetry, which can only strengthen their own creative output.

a.caldwell@bolton.ac.uk

Further information on Creative Writing at The University of Bolton:

http://courses.bolton.ac.uk/Details/Index/1626

Further information on NAWE:

www.nawe.co.uk

My current poetry collection: Talking with the Dead, Cinnamon Press,

http://www.cinnamonpress.com/product-item/talking-to-the-dead/

 

Anne Caldwell

Anne grew up in the north-west of England and now lives in West Yorkshire. Her poetry has been published widely in the UK. She teaches creative writing at The University of Bolton, and is just about to take up a new position as the Deputy Director of  NAWE – the National Association for Writers in Education. www.nawe.co.uk.  Her poetry collection, Talking with the Dead, was published by Cinnamon Press in 2011.  ‘Anne Caldwell’s poems deal passionately with grief and birth, love – and lobsters.  They are intensely alive, flighty as young animals; powerful and varied as the sea.’ Alison Brackenbury.  http://annecaldwell.net

 

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