Poetry By Heart Blog

Fey Popoola’s Poetry By Heart Journey

31st October 2014

Fey Popoola (third from left, front row) at the Poetry By Heart 2014 National Finals held at the National Portrait Gallery. March 2014

Poetry By Heart 2014 National Finalist Fey Popoola reflects on taking poems to heart.

 

I never thought poetry recitation could be so much fun until I tried it…

 

When Kathleen, my English teacher at college last year, introduced me to the Poetry by Heart competition, I must admit that my motivation to join was more escapism than enthusiasm. It was my last year of college and I was feeling the pressure of A2 revision, university applications and impending adulthood. I needed something else to focus on – and poetry recitation seemed just academic enough to not make me feel guilty for cutting my revision time a little short. (Poetry is wider reading, right? Right??)

The Havering Sixth Form College competition was cosy; just four contestants at the back of our library, with a few snacks and some cake (tip to teachers: bring cake!). I could immediately sense, when we were reciting our poems, that there was an atmosphere of respect and togetherness in the room. The whole process of choosing two poems from the anthology, spending hours learning them by heart and then sharing them with friends is really a bonding experience – and this feeling only intensified as I progressed through the competition, right down to the final.

For the last few months I’ve been an ambassador for the Poetry by Heart competition, talking about my experiences at schools, contributing to PGCE workshops and conferences organised by  NATE (National Association for the Teaching of English) and NAWE (National Association of Writers in Education). Perhaps the most common question I’ve been asked about the competition is, “How do you do it? How do you memorise a poem?” My answer is always somewhere along the lines of: “It’s fun. When it’s fun, it isn’t hard.”

I think that’s the main difference between what we think of when we hear “poetry recitation” and what we see and experience during Poetry by Heart. Instead of being force-fed mass produced interpretations, we internalised these poems, forming our own personalised meanings. This was especially noticeable when we had people reciting the same poems in some rounds. They were the same words, but vastly different understandings of those words.  Each person reciting brought a new dimension to their poem.

I believe that when you learn a poem by heart, you access it at a level that is almost impossible to reach just by reading it on a page. Unlike in an exam setting, where you focus on the metaphors and enjambment and other techniques, you actually get to the heart of the poem and can explore its tone, pacing, rhythm and melody. These things can often get overlooked in the classroom.

One of the best things about Poetry by Heart is the atmosphere. There’s a sense of calm and friendliness in the air, from the school competitions all the way through to the finals; we all want each other to succeed. I think that’s because of the shared journey we have all taken with our poems. We are in the company of other people who love – or are starting to love— poetry, which shifts the mood from that which we sometimes experience in our school classes. It creates a safe place for us to geek out about literature, and provides accessible exposure to a variety of poets and poems, from Tichborne to Armitage.

My advice to anybody considering entering the competition: Go for it! You have nothing to lose, and everything to gain. You’ll learn so much about yourself, how you learn and how much you can achieve. And to boot, nothing is cooler than reciting poetry at parties (I promise!).

 

Fey in full flow at the national Finals 2014

 

Best of luck and maybe see you around!

Fey Popoola (National Finalist 2014 and Poetry By Heart 2015 Ambassador)

Share via

National Poetry Day and Poetry By Heart

17th October 2014

James reciting at the Poetry Podium in Bristol

National Poetry Day on October 2nd saw members of the Poetry By Heart team hit the road in search of some poetry inspired adventures. Poetry pilgrims Alison Powell, Kath Lee and Tom Boughen share some tales below.

 

Alison Powell (Regional Development Coordinator for the South West) organised an innovative “Poetry Podium” event in Bristol.

 The (Loud) Sound of Sense

How do you make a three-year-old, a distant relative of Andrew Marvell and a retired dancer from Bristol happy?  By giving them the chance to read poetry in public apparently.  To celebrate this year’s National Poetry Day the South West contingency of PBH came up with the Poetry Podium, a flash-mob-style, open-air event in which members of the public were encouraged to join us on College Green in Bristol and read their favourite poem out loud.  And by loud, I mean really loud.  As in, through a megaphone loud!

Robert Frost claimed that poetry has a ‘sound of sense’ and can ‘communicate through its sound even before we grasp its semantic meaning.’  The sound of poetry blasting across the city centre’s favourite picnicking spot brought smiles, laughter and, when Keith Walker read his eulogy to his wife and dance partner, a few poignant tears.  Tim Popple, director of music at Bristol Cathedral, delighted us with ‘Bermudas’, chosen because of his relation to poet Marvell.  And three-year-old Autumn sang to us that famous 19th century poem ‘The Star’ by Jane Taylor (aka ‘Twinkle, Twinkle’).

People came from all over town to take part and to listen in a true testament to the power of poetry spoken aloud.  (Alison Powell)

Autumn aged 3 reciting at the poetry podium in Bristol with a little help from MC Faye Dicker

 

Tom Boughen (Poetry By Heart Project Assistant) enjoyed the Foyle Young Poets awards and a poetry extravaganza at the Southbank Centre in London

On the last two National Poetry Days, I have found myself at a celebration in the heart of London, hobnobbing with a group of talented and passionate people. Last year we launched Poetry By Heart on National Poetry Day (within a week of me starting this job!) This year I travelled down to the Southbank Centre in London with Julie Blake the co-director of Poetry By Heart for the Foyle Young Poets awards and subsequent poetry readings. It was a celebration of both young and established poets, with classic and contemporary styles.

I won’t lie; the Foyle group of youngsters made me feel very old! The young poets had been selected from thousands of entries from around the world and the fifteen deserving winners read their work at the awards. I’ve got a decade on most of them and the level of maturity and sophistication in their poems surprised me. It’s given me a strong reminder that I should no longer be amazed by the talent of teenagers, especially after working with Poetry By Heart! We’re well aware that lots of our PBH students also have a talent for writing, and it would be great to see some familiar faces at the Foyle Young Poets awards in the future.

One of the best things about the day was the encouragement of children and teenagers to engage in poetry. Local schools were invited to listen to readings by John Hegley, Julia Donaldson (writer of the classic ‘The Gruffalo’), and some cool contemporary poets like Hollie McNish, Dizraeli, Ross Sutherland, Raymond Antrobus and Joelle Taylor. They understood their audience, and some of the children watching seemed young enough for this to be their first poetry reading. I’ve come to realise over the past year that one of the biggest challenges facing the world of poetry is convincing the public that it can speak for everybody and challenge conventional thought in the same way that people readily accept other forms of literature can do. Involving children in these kinds of events is an excellent way of conveying from a young age the fact that poetry is universal, whether communicated on the page or in spoken word. That’s National Poetry Day for you!

(Tom Boughen)

Winners of the Foyle Young Poets Award 2014. Photograph:copyright @ Hayley Madden – Courtesy of the Poetry Society http://www.poetrysociety.org.uk/

 

Kath Lee (Poetry By Heart Project Coordinator) navigated the magnificent new Library of Birmingham for the launch of the Poetry By Heart anthology and a memorable evening in the company of poet Jackie Kay.

What better way to spend the evening of National Poetry Day than in the company of the wonderful Jackie Kay? Mike Dixon, (Poetry By Heart Regional Development Coordinator for the South East) and I accepted the kind invitation from our friends at Writing West Midlands to the opening event of this year’s Birmingham Literature Festival. It also marked the launch of the Poetry By Heart Anthology.

The best poetry readings are like the best first date; you get all the best stories, a few revelations and wittiest repartee. Jackie’s poems are also populated by a wide variety of voices, so by the end of the evening you’ve also been introduced to the family.  Jackie read mainly from her 2011 collection ‘Fiere’ and those poems are optimistic and cheery, even when addressing the complexities of families and her own less than ordinary personal history. She also read our PBH timeline and anthology choice, ‘Dusting the Phone’ which we loved, but she says she is mystified at its selection from all her work. We’re not sure we had the poets in mind when we suggested people ‘Argue with the Anthology’, but why not? Her Question and Answer session was a happy blend of thoughtful reflection on her writing process and fond recollections of her childhood, and giggling. All this, and her generous praise of the new anthology, meant that by the end of the evening we were completely smitten!  (Kath Lee)

Library of Birmingham: Photographer: Bruce Stokes https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/legalcode

 

Share via

Is there a poem in your head?

3rd October 2014

The nationwide Poetry and Memory survey launched on 2nd October, UK National Poetry Day. The survey is part of the Cambridge University’s Poetry and Memory Project, which is investigating experiences of poetry learning, and examining the relationships between memorisation, recitation and understanding. David Whitley and Debbie Pullinger of the Faculty of Education at Cambridge University have been very interested in the work of Poetry By Heart and some of the research undertaken as part of their Cambridge Poetry Teaching Project appears in the Resources section of the Poetry By Heart website. Project Researcher Dr Debbie Pullinger tells us about this new and exciting Poetry and Memory Project.

 

Do you have a poem in your head? Then do come and tell us about it. It can be any poem, and any type of poem – we just ask that it isn’t a song lyric or a nursery rhyme.

There have been quite a few poetry polls over the years, mostly directed at finding the nation’s favourites. Our aim, however, is rather different. We want to discover what poems people know by heart – what poetry resides in our collective memory, at this moment, in October 2014. To the best of our knowledge, this is first time a survey of this kind and scope has been attempted.

As well as asking what the poem is and when you learned it, we’re also asking a couple of open-ended questions about what it means for you. The important thing here is that we’re emphatically not looking for GCSE English answers, or an analysis of what the poem is ‘supposed to be about’. Rather, we want to know about the personal significance of this particular poem. This might be to something do with the meaning, but it could also be to do with the sound. It may be that there’s one line which is particularly special. It may be that how you understand or feel about the poem has changed over the years.  It may be that you associate the poem with a particular occasion or period of your life. Or, it could be that the poem you know actually has very little meaning or significance for you at all – and we want to know about that, too.

Straight off, we expect to be able to announce what poems beat most strongly at the heart of the nation. It will be interesting, too, to see how they map on to those favourites lists. But aside from producing a headline top ten, there’s a great deal more that we’ll be able to do with this data.  We’ll be able to investigate, for example, the reasons why people now learn poetry, and the perceived value of doing so. We’re particularly interested in questions about the ‘use’ of learned poems – how they might act as an emotional resource, contribute to a sense of identity, assist in the development of an ear for language, engender a sense of community, play a role in memories of a personal or communal past. What does knowing a poem mean for someone, and indeed what different things does it mean for different people?

We’re really looking forward to seeing the responses to the survey and sharing the results. But, of course, its success as a piece of research hangs on getting a good response – which means we need lots of people to take part. So we really do need your help. You can do this in two ways.

Take part in the survey – if you have a poem in your head, please come and tell us about it. http://www.poetryandmemory.com/

 

Spread the word –  even if you don’t know a poem yourself, do pass the word on to family, friends, neighbours and colleagues. I should also mention that it will be possible for print out a copy of the survey to give to anyone unable to access it online. They can then post it back to us using the Freepost address.

You can get spreading any way you fancy. Phone a friend. Find us on Facebook (The Poetry and Memory Project). Tweet on Twitter: @poetryandmemory #poetryandmemorysurvey.  Print a poster and display it on your favourite notice board.

Whatever you can do, we’ll be enormously grateful.

The survey runs from 2nd–31st October and is open to anyone in the UK aged 18 or over. For more about the survey and the Poetry and Memory Project: www.poetryandmemory.com

image of staff member

Debbie Pullinger is the project’s full-time researcher, based in the Faculty of Education, where she also teaches on the Children and Literature course. Her doctoral project, completed in 2013, was on orality and textuality in poetry written for children. Debbie worked in primary teaching, in educational publishing, and as a freelance writer before returning to academia in 2009.

 

Share via